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The proposed Clean Water Act determination should NOT be withdrawn. The potential impacts of the proposed Pebble Mine on the health of the Bristol Bay watershed and the livelihood of thousands of people in Alaska are far too great. Those risks include loss of up to up to 94 miles of salmon-supporting streams and up to 4,900 acres of wetlands and ponds, and the very real potential of wastewater dam failure resulting in damage to or destruction of the salmon fishery. The watershed supports the largest sockeye salmon fishery in the world and 25 federally recognized tribes who for 4,000 years have depended on the fishery for their subsistence-based culture. The overwhelming majority of residents of Bristol Bay are opposed to the project, and a statewide majority of voters also oppose it. The watershed’s unique ecological resources generate significant economic benefits and employment. EPA’s original watershed assessment was scientifically robust and thoroughly peer-reviewed. That assessment and related public comments should strongly influence any future action.

References:
U.S. EPA. An Assessment of Potential Mining Impacts on Salmon Ecosystems of Bristol Bay, Alaska (Final Report). U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA 910-R-14-001A-C, ES, 2014.
EPA Region 10, Proposed Determination Pursuant to Section 404(c) of the Clean Water Act for Pebble Deposit Area, Southwest Alaska, July 21, 2014.
2017 EPA and Pebble Limited Partnership Agreement.
U.S. EPA. An Assessment of Potential Mining Impacts on Salmon Ecosystems of Bristol Bay, Alaska (Final Report). U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA 910-R-14-001A-C, ES, 2014. Chapter 5.
United Tribes of Bristol Bay. Opposition to Pebble Mine Reiterated by local tribes, fishermen, business owners.
Alaska Bristol Bay Mining Ban, Ballot Measure 4 (2014).

In July 2014 EPA proposed to restrict dumping of mining wastes in the Bristol Bay watershed in Southwest Alaska to protect salmon fisheries. The pristine habitat in the watershed sustains one of world’s most important fisheries, including half of the global supply of wild sockeye salmon. On July 19, 2017, The Trump Administration proposed to withdraw the July 2014 proposed determination.

Via SaveEPA